Sublimation Issues Made Simple

By Tom Chambers

In my last article, I alluded to a future blog post relating to unacceptable sublimation image quality that was caused by “simple issues”.  Well, here are several simple things that can cause hair pulling moments, sleepless nights, and cost you a lot of money – but are easily checked and corrected.

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list of everything that can happen or go wrong.  It IS however a basic guide to most of the simpler issues that can arise, especially when a user is relatively new to sublimation.

While the list below is written with the Sawgrass Virtuoso series of inkjet sublimation systems in mind, it will apply to many others as well.  It does not, however, specifically address additional issues that can arise with bulk ink systems, aftermarket systems, or generic inks.

Some of the following may seem a bit obvious or even silly, but you’d be surprised at how many times these occur in real life – sometimes even to people who know better.

Issue:  The sublimated image is faint / faded looking / invisible, even though it looks ok on paper.

  • Are you using sublimation paper? Yes, sometimes people will get the idea to save some money and try regular inkjet paper or even copy paper.  Results will vary, but in general you will never achieve good quality results with any paper other than one designed for sublimation.
  • Are you printing on the correct side of the sublimation paper? Most sublimation paper has a printable, coated side which is typically a brighter, whiter color, and a non-printable side that is off white, duller, or even watermarked.  Depending on your printer and its printing path, the paper could need placing either face up or face down.
  • Are you using sublimation ink? Believe it or not, this happens.  Simply put, sublimation requires specific sublimation ink designed for the printer that you are using.  Regular ink will not work.
  • Is your heat press on / fully heated up / actually at the displayed temperature? Always give your press time to warm up to the correct temperature first, and you should also be using a pyrometer to keep tabs on the actual vs. displayed temperature.  Read this article for more in-depth information on that subject.

Issue:  The images printed on paper don’t look like what is on the computer screen.

As long as there are no defects showing in the print, this is usually not a problem.  It is normal for the printed image to look duller, darker, or even have different colors from the image on the screen.  Unlike printing a photo onto regular photo paper for example, during the sublimation process the color also changes and becomes more like what you see on your monitor.  The best thing to do is to sublimate the image first, then compare.  If you have doubts, use a piece of polyester fabric to test on first.

Issue:  The sublimated image has a double image / faint outline or shadow, but the printed image is fine.

This is called “ghosting” and is caused when the paper shifts sideways during sublimation while everything is hot.   Most often, it happens when the press head comes up too fast creating a vacuum that sucks in air, causing the paper to move.  It can also happen when you are removing the paper if you pull it sideways instead of quickly pulling it straight up.  Another possibility is on a draw press, when drawing the platen out too fast.  Be a bit more careful, use heat tape to affix the paper to your sublimation blank, use a tiny amount of a temporary spray adhesive on the paper, or use an adhesive type sublimation paper.

Issue:  The printed image and / or sublimated image has light or dark horizontal lines in it.

Light lines are most often caused by one or more clogged print nozzles, where there is no ink being printed of a particular color.  The first thing you should do is print a nozzle check, and look for any gaps in the lines.  You may see only one, or it could be several.  If you do, run a head cleaning, followed by another nozzle check.  You should see fewer or no gaps.  If there are still gaps, repeat the process and check again.  As long as the number of gaps decrease or change locations, continue this process around 5 times, and by then you shouldn’t have any gaps remaining.  If some gaps remain and are always in the same place after a few cleanings, you may have more serious issues that require a call to tech support.

Dark lines are usually caused by the print head being out of alignment, and to a lesser extent, light lines can point to this as well.  To correct this, follow the procedures for your printer to print and adjust the print head alignment.  This is typically a straightforward process that gives you step by step instructions to follow.

Both nozzle check and print head alignment procedures are usually accessed in your printer driver maintenance area.

Issue:  The sublimated colors don’t closely match what it shows on the screen.

This one is a bit trickier to explain as there are a variety of possible causes and troubleshooting is considerably more involved, and there will always be some slight differences between what you see and what you sublimate, but I will address the most common, easiest to fix issues here.  Where more specific instructions are needed, always refer to the information provided with your particular printer and sublimation system.

  • Are you printing to the correct printer driver? With many printers that use Sawgrass ink, there are two printer drivers for your printer – a virtual printer driver that does the color correction for sublimation, and the actual OEM printer driver for printing.  Frequently, I see cases where the OEM printer driver has been incorrectly set as the default, so the color correction is being bypassed.  Always make sure you are printing to the virtual printer driver instead.
  • Are your printer driver settings correct? A very common issue that is easy to overlook is the settings within your printer driver.  If you’ve customized it for a particular product, and then go to print something else, you may receive surprising results.
  • Are you using the correct color management settings in your graphics software? Another common issue is not following the correct procedure for a particular sublimation system when configuring graphics software.  Be sure to read any instructions about color management settings for your system, graphics software version, and operating system.  Failing to set up your graphics program properly for sublimation can cause unpredictable results with color, since you essentially wind up with multiple programs fighting for control of the color output.
  • Are you using the correct color profile? If color profiles are a part of your system, they must be set up specifically as recommended by whoever provided the profile.  Color profiles are a complex topic outside the scope of this basic article, but suffice it to say that not having them set up correctly or using the wrong one will definitely affect your color output.

If the above doesn’t solve your issue, or if you have questions about anything, feel free to contact us.  We’re always here to help.

Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

Your Heat Press and You

by Tom Chambers

My esteemed colleague and professional writer Kristine Shreve has written much ado about heat presses over the years.  Among those articles are “Buying a Heat Press“, “ Uses for a Heat Press“,  “5 Things to Consider When Buying a Heat Press“, and “A Heat Press Primer“.  I’m sure there are more, and there is a ton of useful information in those articles.

So why am I writing yet another article about a heat press?  Because at some point after you read all the above articles and did all your research, you made the decision and bought a heat press.  Now you have to set it up and learn to use it.  How do you do that?  I know, that may seem obvious and simple, but there’s a bit more to it than just taking it out of the box and plugging it in.  That’s where this article comes in.

Setup

The very first thing you need to do when you receive your new heat press is to open up the manual, read what the requirements are, and do a bit of preparation.  If you have access to the manual before you receive your press, you will be ahead of the game when it arrives.

Before you set it up, you need to have a work area large enough for both the press and the work you will be doing.  If it’s a clamshell, you’ll need enough overhead clearance so the upper platen can be raised and lowered without hitting your knuckles on a cabinet bottom (or anything else).  If it’s a swing-away or drawer press, you’ll need additional space to the side and/or front.  You’ll also need a sturdy table, counter, or dedicated stand to place the press on.

The press should be conveniently located near an electrical source that meets or exceeds the requirements of the press. The electrical requirements will be expressed in amps, volts, and watts in the manual (or on the web site) for the press you bought.

You should make sure that you do not exceed the capacity of your electrical circuit and always plug directly into an outlet, not an extension cord.  Overloaded circuits can cause issues ranging from simply tripping a circuit breaker, all the way up to starting a fire and burning down the building.  My recommendation is that if you don’t know what you are doing here, consult an electrician.

If it is an air operated press, you’ll need an air compressor with enough capacity to supply the press, an air supply line of an appropriate diameter and length, plus any fittings necessary.

Not having appropriate electric and air supplies can also cause issues with the operation of the heat press.

Settings

Once you’ve set everything up, you should familiarize yourself with the features your press offers, especially the controls and how to change the settings.  For example, many presses offer the ability to store presets for various products in memory for easy recall.  This can be a real time saver if you have to press a lot of different products with different settings.

No matter the manufacturer, model, or style of heat press, they all have 3 settings in common.  Those are:  time, heat, and pressure.  Whether you plan to do sublimation, vinyl, transfers, rhinestones, or anything else, every single thing you will want to use your heat press for uses those 3 in varying degrees (bad pun fully intended).

Therefore, you will need to know what those 3 settings should be for whatever you are pressing at any given time, and that the settings will vary widely between products.  Manufacturers and distributors have recommended settings, and you will usually obtain those from your place of purchase.

Of the 3 settings, “time” is most consistent and reliable from press to press.  Typically this is a digital timer that either prompts you to release the press, or automatically does it for you, after your set period of time has elapsed.

You would think that the second setting, “temperature” would be consistent as well, but that is rarely the case.  Most heat presses vary anywhere from a few degrees to 20 or 30 degrees F from their displayed temperature, and this can change as they age.  It is important to know what your actual temperature is, because that directly affects the end results of what you are pressing.

Knowing the actual temperature requires a tool called a pyrometer with a surface probe, and purchasing one will be the best investment you make for your heat press.  It can potentially save you hours of frustration and thousands of dollars in ruined products.

Finally, there’s “pressure”.  On a manually operated heat press, setting the pressure is simply an educated guess.  Heavy pressure means you have to put a good amount of force on the handle to fully close the press.  Light pressure means you only have to put a little force on it.  Some manual presses provide a sensor and graphic display for the pressure, but those should not be taken as precise.  By contrast, an air operated press has an adjustable gauge or dial that shows you exactly how many psi (pounds per square inch) of line pressure is set.

Support

Now you are ready to press.  Follow any additional instructions for your press, but don’t be afraid to experiment either – it’s common to have to make some adjustments to published manufacturer settings as you press different things, and what works on one press may not be exactly the same on another.

It’s usually best to leave your press on even if you won’t be using it for an hour or two.  Turn it off only when you aren’t going to be using it for several hours or more.

Be sure to drain water from any air lines daily, follow any manufacturer’s maintenance recommendations, and keep support numbers handy for any questions or repairs.

As always, contact us with any questions.

Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

Help! My Sublimation System Has Been Sitting, and I Can’t Print Out!

by Tom Chambers

A not uncommon tech support question I get is “I bought a sublimation system  ___ years ago, and I never opened the box. What do I need to do?”  Another variation is, “I bought a sublimation system ___ years ago, and used it a couple times and then ___ happened and I never got back to it.  What do I need to do? Now it won’t print.”

OK, I know, it’s your money, and you can spend it however you want, but if you have that much money lying around to spend on something you aren’t ever going to use, send it to me instead, and I’ll go on vacation.  I’ll even send you pictures if you want.  Or you can go on vacation yourself, see the world, and enjoy life; donate to a charity or other worthy cause.

Unlike some out there, we don’t want to “just get the sale”.   We want to help you to be successful too. If you are uncertain, do more research until you aren’t. Ask us questions.  If you are still too intimidated, find someone who does sublimation, and if they will let you, work with them for a while for free to learn about it (preferably not a potential competitor in the same area or that could be awkward).  Or consider that maybe sublimation just isn’t for you.

A lot of system purchases are impulse buys.  I was told once several years ago that up to 80% of all sublimation systems purchased were never used, or only used once or twice.  I was recently told that the numbers have improved, but it’s still over 50%.

Look, we sell sublimation systems, and we will happily take your money if you want to spend it, but we’d much rather help you to do what’s right for YOU in YOUR situation for what YOU want to do.

If you have already spent your money on a system and you are still too intimidated to open up the box,  or maybe “life happened” and there are no plans to use the system, I recommend you just sell it on eBay,  Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, one of your local Facebook yard sale groups, or any of a thousand other venues before you lose your entire investment.  Getting something back is better than nothing.

You’re probably wondering why any of this matters, so to that end, here are some significant reasons not to buy a system and let it sit unopened or unused.

  1. The ink expires. Yes, that’s right, that expensive sublimation ink has an expiration date on the cartridge.  While it won’t magically stop working on that exact date, it is a fact that over time the ink will degrade, the sublimation dye will separate out, and the particles will clump together.  All that is a recipe for clogging up the print heads, lines, and ruining the printer.
  2. Ink dries up. Over time, the ink that is loaded into your printer will eventually dry out if it sits idle, especially if there’s any air in it. The Sawgrass Virtuoso printers are much more forgiving of sitting idle for periods of time – but even those can’t sit indefinitely for months and months or years without suffering consequences.  And other printers?  Good luck getting those working again after sitting unused like that.
  3. Hardware goes bad. Granted, a lower risk than the ink, but all those parts and electronics in the printer – capacitors in particular – age and can go bad after enough time, even if they aren’t being used.
  4. Hardware becomes obsolete. If enough time elapses, even if the printer is still in good condition and would work – it may not be possible to obtain sublimation ink for it any longer.  While Sawgrass does make ink for many models of printers long past their obsolescence date, that support does eventually end.

So what if you have already purchased a system and it is either still sitting in the box, or just hasn’t been used for a long time, and now you want to give it a go?  Regardless of your reasons, there’s no judgment here – we’re here to help.

If you have an unopened, unloaded system you bought some time ago and want to start using now, first check the expiration date on the ink.  If it’s well expired – throw it away and buy a new set of sublimation ink for your printer before you do anything else.  Otherwise, your printer becomes a slot machine in Las Vegas, and that long expired ink could ruin you.

On the other hand, if you have a system that has been sitting loaded but unused for a very long period of time, you have nothing to lose by trying to print again.  The ink is already in it, and either it is bad, or it isn’t.  If it does print correctly right away or after a few nozzle checks and cleanings, you should still check the expiration date on the ink.  If it is well past expiration, replace it immediately, and run a few cleanings to flush the old ink out.

If the print quality is still bad and your ink has expired, you have a couple of choices – either buy new ink and try to revive the printer, or just buy another system.

To help determine which choice to make, run a nozzle check followed by a head cleaning and another nozzle check.  Compare the nozzle checks, and note the position of any gaps.  Repeat the process a few times.  If the gaps are always in the same spot, your head is likely permanently clogged and you probably need a new system.   If the gaps change location, this is a good candidate for trying a new set of ink – but there are no guarantees, and a new system is always a safe bet.

Please contact us if you have any questions.

Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

 

 

How Many Prints Can You Get From a Kit of Sublimation Ink?

Alternative title:  How Many Prints Could a Printer Print, if a Printer Could Print Prints?
By Tom Chambers

If you really just want an answer to take away and skip reading the rest of this article –  then figure a penny per square inch is what it will cost you for the ink to print sublimation*.  That’s a safe number that you probably won’t go wrong with, and your paper cost is simply the cost of a sheet of paper divided by how many items you get out of it.  If you’d like to know the “why and how” though, then read on.

One of the most common questions I hear at trade shows and over the phone regarding sublimation is “How many prints can I get out of a set of sublimation ink?”  It’s a great question that is asked in all sincerity, but one that is completely impossible to answer.  I will even go so far as to say that anyone that will tell you a specific number of prints in answer to that question either isn’t being truthful or doesn’t understand the question.  Why?   Because everyone and every design is different.  What you print and sell isn’t going to be the same thing that someone else prints and sells, plus you aren’t going to be printing the same exact design over and over again.  To illustrate this, here are a couple of basic examples.

Susie prints full color, full coverage 11” x 17” size paper prints for Vapor Apparel t-shirts on her SG800 sublimation system using extended ink cartridges**.  John on the other hand sells to souvenir shops, florists, does some custom work, uses standard size 8.5″ x 11″ paper on the smaller SG400 system, but prints a wide variety of name tags, belt buckles, ceramic tiles, the ever ubiquitous 11oz coffee mugs, and a few other products – all having different sizes, different types of art, and different levels of ink coverage.

In the two scenarios above, who uses the most ink?  How many t-shirt prints does Susie get vs. John when he prints name tags?  Any effort to answer the question would result in Susie having to print as many pages of a particular full page t-shirt design as she could before the ink ran out, and John printing out pages and pages of name tags until the ink ran out.  And the end result of this particular test would ultimately be useless against any future projections, unless Susie and John only ever printed that one design.  Apples and oranges comparisons like this never work.

The real problem here is with the question itself.  The one people should be asking, and the one that they really want the answer to anyway even if they don’t know it, is “What’s it going to cost me to print something?”  And THAT question has an answer – one that is based on 3 very simple principles and some pretty basic math.

  1. The Coverage Area: How many square inches are in your design?
  2. The Coverage Percentage: What percentage of the coverage area is printed?
  3. Designs Per Page: How many designs can you print on a single page?

Calculating this is a lot easier than it sounds, and the important thing here is to realize that it isn’t necessary to be absolutely precise – some rounding and fairly close guesses are perfectly fine.

First let’s figure out your coverage area.  To do that, take the overall height of the image and multiply it by the width of the image to obtain the area in square inches (or centimeters, if you are using metric).  You can even do circles the same way, just lower your coverage percentage estimate since the “corners” don’t really exist and are empty.

For any mathematicians out there that want greater accuracy with circles, the formula is A = π r2 (take half the diameter, times itself, times 3.14.)

For example, your design for an 11oz mug that measures 3.25” high x 8” wide would be 26 square inches.  Or, a 3” circle ornament or coaster would be 7.1 square inches.

Once you have the square inches in your coverage area, estimate your percentage of coverage based on a visual “best guess” of the amount of that area covered by your design.  Keep in mind that light, pale colors use less ink and are thus considered to be lower coverage, while darker colors are considered higher.  Open areas and white space are zero coverage.  Consider light coverage to be below 40%; medium is 40%-60%, and heavy is above 60%.

Next, multiply the square inches by $0.0075 (3/4 of a cent) for typical medium coverage designs.  For light coverage, use $0.005 (half a cent), or for heavy coverage, use $0.01 (one cent).

Assuming an average medium coverage design, the ink cost of our mug and ornament examples would be rounded to $0.20 cents and $0.05 cents, respectively.

Last but not least, let’s figure out what the paper cost is.  Using 8.5” x 11” paper, you can fit 3 of those mug designs on one page, or 5 of the 3” ornaments.  Based on the cost of a single pack of 100 sheets of our MPRES sublimation paper at $0.14 cents per page, your paper cost is under $0.05 cents per mug, or under $0.03 cents per ornament.

Add the paper cost to your ink cost, and that brings the total in ink and paper to $0.25 and $0.08 for your mug and ornament, and now you know what your items will cost you to print.  That’s it!

*All calculations used in this article are based on the market standard Sawgrass HD series sublimation ink for the Sawgrass Virtuoso SG400 and SG800 series of desktop sublimation printers.  Other printers, inks, and formats may result in different costs. 

**The extended size ink cartridges save approximately 25% in ink cost over standard ink cartridges due to their larger capacity and lower price per milliliter of ink.

Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

How To Sublimate Without a Sublimation System

In a previous article I wrote a tongue-in-cheek bit about people who shouldn’t do sublimation.  I said how if you couldn’t use a computer, sublimation probably wasn’t for you.  Like most generalizations though, it isn’t 100% applicable in all cases. Hey, at least I used the word “probably”.

Now, I’m going to tell you how you CAN create unique and interesting items, sublimate them to the sublimation blank of your choice, and sell them to others – even somewhere like Etsy – all WITHOUT a sublimation system.   In fact, you don’t really need a computer, printer, or heat press!  What? Heresy you say?  Read on.

I’m talking about Artesprix Sublimation Markers.  Basically, they took sublimation ink and put it into a set of 10 colors of chisel tip markers that you can draw and color with.  With these markers, you can draw anything that your artistic talents render you capable of drawing, and then put it (sublimate it) onto any of the thousands of available sublimation blank items.

If it sounds simple, it is, and there are a few different ways you can use these markers, depending on your level of sublitivity (sublimation + creativity).

The Artist:  If you have lots of talent in the drawing and painting department, then this opens up a new way for you to create and sell unique one-offs of your work.  Artesprix markers lend themselves well to sketches, line art, and other methods of drawing that aren’t extremely finely detailed.  As an artist you have the most flexibility, since you truly don’t need any of the normal sublimation equipment.

If you do have a sublimation system, you can produce numbered copies of your designs on the system and then use the markers to paint or color and make each one unique in its own way.

While application of the drawing to a sublimation blank is definitely easier with a heat press, you can use an iron for many fabrics and flat goods, or a mug wrap and oven for several different kinds of drinkware.  And, unique, hand crafted items are especially well suited for selling in your Etsy store.

The Colorist:  Love to color in coloring books?  Using your regular non-sublimation printer, paper, and computer, you can find or design and print patterns and drawings for coloring (or just tear out pages from a coloring book).  Then, take the Artesprix markers, trace the lines, color in your design, and sublimate away.  If you happen to already have a sublimation system, you can print patterns and drawings on plain paper using the sublimation ink, and then color in with the markers.

The Memorist:  For lasting memories, give the markers to the kids (or adult kids) and let them draw or color something on paper instead of on the wall.  You take it, sublimate it, and you’ve created a lasting keepsake.  You can do this for your own kids or for other groups such as birthday parties, classes, or even art classes in schools.  Sell the sublimated products to the parents (or the kids), and they’ll have something they can use and will last a lot longer than a refrigerator drawing.

The Craftist:  Check out some craft stores, craft meetups, make-and-takes, or other craft related classes and venues.  Crafters love making unique items and learning something new.  Show them how it works, sublimate their work on site with a heat press (or even show them how to do it), and rake in the dough.

There are probably other categories of people who can use Artesprix markers, but I couldn’t think of more clever words ending in “ist” to name them with.  At any rate these should give you lots of start-up ideas on how to use them.

For full directions on using Artesprix markers or to order up a few sets for yourself, see our product page and click on the “Instructions” tab (and the other tabs as well).  As always, feel free to contact us with any questions.

Article by Tom Chambers; Artwork by Carolyn Cagle, Strikke Embroidery
Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

3 Groups Who Should Never Do Sublimation (and 1 Group Who Should)

by Tom Chambers

There are 3 groups of people who should never do sublimation.  Are you one of them?

  1. People who have absolutely no interest in sublimation.

Hey, I’m not here to convince you to do something you have no interest in.  If you aren’t interested in a way to decorate thousands of items in full photo-realistic color easily and quickly at high profit margins – who am I to suggest otherwise?

  1. People who have no creativity.

While practically everyone has some level of creativity out there including most who think they don’t, there are a handful of people that just have no imagination at all. If you can’t take a picture of your cat, write a sentence, or print something, then sublimation probably isn’t for you.

  1. People who cannot use a computer.

Let’s face it, not everyone is a computer nerd.  Not everyone wants to be, and thankfully, no one has to be.  Most people have at least had limited exposure to computers on some level.  However, if you are one of those who prefer to avoid such modern contrivances in favor of more conventional means like pen and paper, then you probably shouldn’t do sublimation.

If you don’t fall into one of the above groups, then read on, this article is for you.

Sublimation is EASY.  That’s right, EASY, in all CAPS.  People get hung up all the time on the word “sublimation” and the definition, because it sounds scientific and complicated, which apparently makes it so intimidating that people will sometimes buy a sublimation system and then store it in a corner and look at it periodically, too afraid to even open the box.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

Ok, so “sublimation” IS scientific and complicated – but you don’t actually need to know any of that, any more than you need to know what science is behind the print-head and the electronics inside your printer that make it work to print pictures of your children, pets, or a business plan for that great idea for a sublimation business.

When you print something, you don’t think about printing – you just print, right?  Sublimation is like that too.  In fact, printing is the first step in the process, so if you have already printed something, you already know what to do.  Not very intimidating is it?

Sublimation is FUN.  Here again, FUN in all CAPS.  You should enjoy what you do, and if you can make money at it, that’s even better.  Sublimation is fun because you are limited only by your imagination.  If you can imagine something and print it, then you can put it (sublimate it) onto one or more of the thousands of blank items just waiting for your sublimativity (sublimation + creativity; I just made that up – feel free to credit me).

Once you’ve sublimated something, you can sell it and make money.  Putting the image you printed onto a sublimation blank is the second step in the process, which usually involves a heat press.  Doing all that IS fun, and not very intimidating either.

Sublimation is PROFITABLE.  Yes, I know, to be redundant, PROFITABLE in all CAPS.  That’s because the margins can be quite astounding.  Where else can you start up a business for under $2000 (and in some cases, even under $700!), have fun doing it, and make anywhere from 2 to 6 times your cost, typically on the higher end of that range?  For the mathematically challenged, that means if you have a product that costs you $3, including the cost of the ink and paper and your time, you can sell it for $6 to $18.

Oh, and did I mention that from the point in time you decide to embark on a sublimation journey until you will be making products to sell can be as quick as 1 day?  Contact us for more information and if you have any questions.

This introductory article is broad in scope, but future articles will expand some of the individual points mentioned into their own articles.

Tom Chambers is EnMart’s sublimation guru,  the guide and mentor regarding all things sublimation.   Tom was instrumental in introducing inkjet sublimation to industrial laundries, and has been working with the process since the early days of thermal ribbon sublimation. 

How to Get the Most from a Trade Show

One of the things we talk about a lot on this blog and its sister blog,  Threaducate is the benefits of attending an industry trade show,  and what you can learn from your attendance.   For those who have never been to an industry show,   it’s a place where vendors gather to showcase their new equipment and products.  Some shows will allow actual sales of goods on the show floor,  others will not.   A show is a great place to learn, to find new products,  and to price and test new equipment.   If you are able to attend an industry trade show,  it’s well worth the price and the time.

EnMart has been exhibiting at trade shows,  and attending them as well,  for pretty much as long as the company has been existence.  Over that time,  we’ve figured out some things that we recommend attendees do to get the most from their attendance.   Here are our top tips for getting the maximum value from your trade show attendance.

Tip 1:  Have a plan – Most shows will have a website that lists exhibitors with a brief explanation of what that exhibitor sells and will be showcasing that the show.   It’s definitely worth the time to figure out who you want to see at the show and what you want to ask those people.   Make notes.  Plan your route through the show to be sure you see those people you absolutely want to see first.

Tip 2:  Dress in layers –  Some show floors will be warm.  Others will be over airconditioned.   Dressing in layers allows you to remove or add clothing as the temperature dictates.   Comfortable shoes are also a must.   Even if the show is a smaller one,  you’re still going to be walking and standing quite a bit.   Shows are much less fun if your feet start hurting in the first hour.

Tip 3:  Do your homework – A trade show may be one of the only opportunities to actually talk to sales reps or technical support people for the equipment you own or want to buy.   Do your research ahead of time and figure out what questions you want to ask.    The more you know,  the better the questions you’ll ask,  and the more useful information you’ll receive.

Tip 4:  Bring business cards –  Even if you don’t normally have business cards,   it’s worth it to try and print some up if you’re going to a show.  There are two reasons to have cards.   One is to give to reps you talk to in the booths you stop at.  Particularly if you’re asking for literature or more information,  having your contact info readily available is very helpful.   The second reason to have business cards is for networking purposes.  You’ll be meeting other people in the industry, some of whom may potential partners,  so it’s good to be able to exchange contact info.

The Wayback Machine: Let’s Revisit Some Posts

One of the things that’s both weird and fun about writing a blog for a number of years is the fact that, over time,  you forget some of what you’ve written.  The focus is more on the next post to be written,  not on the ones that are already done.   Since the SubliStuff blog has been around since 2010,  there are now eight years of posts,  and today I wanted to point out a few that I thought were worth reading again.

In 2010 I wrote a post entitled “5 Reasons Not To Buy a Sublimation System“.  The intent was to do a tongue in cheek post that would really highlight reasons why a sublimation system would make a good addition to a shop.   In 2017,   I updated the post from 2010.   If you’re on the fence about adding sublimation to your shop, for whatever reason,  either of these posts may be helpful.

One of the topics I write about often is finding your market for sublimated goods.   In May of 2017,  I offered 5 tips for finding your sublimation market.   I think my favorite tip from that post was about showcasing what you love.  Hobbies are a great place to find a new sublimation market.

Another tips post,  this one titled “Six Tips for Successfully Sublimating Several Substrates” (yes, I do like alliteration,  why do you ask) gave tips on how to get the most from your sublimation blanks.  As with many posts about sublimation,  this one dealt with the idea that you will screw up and that’s part of the process.  Make your peace with mistakes, everyone encounters them at some point.

In 2014,  the tips I gave had to do with customer service and how to provide the best to your customers.   One of the things I’ve learned over the years, and shared in that post,  was the fact that sometimes customers just need to vent.   It’s never fun to be yelled at,  but sometimes that’s what needs to happen to get the customer to a place where they can talk calmly about the situation.

At EnMart,  we’ve always been dedicated to education,  and try to share our knowledge on this blog and at the trade shows we attend.  We’re always willing to teach others about sublimation and how to be successful with sublimated goods,  but there are some things we can’t teach.   In 2016,  I wrote a post that touched on those things.

Finally,  in 2012,  I wrote a post on decoration intimidation.  It’s something we’ve seen again and again over the years,  a customer either buys a sublimation system and is too scared to use it,  or finds the whole process so intimidating,  they can’t even buy a system at all.   The post was an effort to soothe some fears and perhaps help people to see that trying a new decoration technique isn’t as intimidating as it may seem.  Getting past the fear can open up a whole new world of possibilities.

5 Things to Consider When Buying a Heat Press

Buying a heat press is a big investment,  and the decision about which type of press to buy should be made carefully to ensure that you get the type of press you need and one that will provide the most utility for your shop. Since a heat press is one of the more costly items that people who create sublimated goods will need, it pays to do the research and the math before purchasing a press. When making your buying decision, here are five things you should consider.

#1 Is Cheaper Better – A heat press is a big investment and, especially if a business is just starting out with sublimation,  the impulse might be to go with a no-name Chinese press from eBay or to start with a smaller press that is less costly.   There are,  however,  a couple of problems with this approach.   One is that no-name presses often don’t have service or technical support which leaves you with few to no options if your press breaks.   Buying a smaller, less expensive press can also be problematic as the size of the press will place limits on what can be sublimated.   The rule of thumb is to assess your needs and take into account technical support and repair options and then buy the biggest press you can afford.

#2 Consider your physical abilities – No, running a heat press isn’t as physically taxing as mining coal or being a mover,  but it does take a toll on the body.   Smaller people may have more issue with opening a manual press.  Standing all day can have an impact on the knees and feet.   There are options like auto release pop-up which can make a press easier to operate.   Don’t assume that everyone will be able to operate a press with the same level of ease.   Take into account the physicality of running a press for hours at a time and do what’s necessary to make that physical toll a little less.

#3 What type of goods will you be sublimating? – One of the biggest questions that needs to be answered before any heat press purchase is the type of goods your shop will be selling.   If the goal is to just do garments,  a flat press,  most likely a swing-away press,  would be a useful option.   If you want to do hats or mugs or something that won’t work well in a flat press,   your best bet would either be a specialty press or a combo press.  For those shops doing a variety of items,  a combo press may be best,  as it combines a flat press with the specialty press options.

#4 Where’s the best place to buy a heat press? –  The temptation to buy a heat press on eBay or Amazon,  where the prices seem cheaper may be overwhelming,  but that’s not always the best place to buy a press.   In our opinion,  the best option for purchasing a heat press is from a company that knows and uses heat presses.   If you can purchase directly from the manufacturer that’s great.   When that’s not possible,  the next best option is purchasing from a supplier who uses the presses they sell and knows them well.   Keep in mind the place that sells you the press may also be the place that provides technical and repair support.   The better they know the press,  the more able they will be to assist you when you have an issue.

#5 Can you add other disciplines to maximize the utility of your press? –  Yes,  sublimation is one decoration discipline that requires a heat press,  but it is not the only one.   If you’re buying a press,  you might also want to consider what you already do,  or could add to your shop which could make a heat press that much more useful.   Rhinestones,  screen print transfers,  adding patches to hats or bags,  there are a variety of options for how a heat press can be used.   Spreading the utility out over a variety of disciplines may help your press pay for itself faster,  and help you justify the expense of a bigger and better press.

A Memory You Can Touch

A week or two back I participated in PromoChat, a great discussion from PromoKitchen that happens every Wednesday at 3 p.m. EST on Twitter.    One of the questions in that particular week’s chat was how you could sell your products as keepsakes that would stand the test of time and still keep your customers coming back again and again.    My answer to that question was as follows:

Focus on the fact that you’re creating a memory or preserving a special moment with something people can hold in their hands and cherish forever. There are always more special moments that deserve recording.

One of the things that people selling sublimation forget is that it’s not just a way to put a name on a mug or a picture on a mousepad.   It’s also a method by which memories can be captured and keepsakes created.    Yes,  some of these items might be one of a kind keepsakes,  only special to the particular person that commissions the work,  but one of a kind generally comes with a premium price.

Humans are,  I think,  in some respect hardwired to be collectors.   Maybe it’s shot glasses or spoons.    Could be dolls or dice.   People have collections of postcards,  playing cards and scorecards.   The one thing that holds a collection together is that the particular items are linked to a particular memory.   It could be a memory of place that was visited.   It could be a memory of a much loved person who is no longer around.  Often it’s a memory of a time,  a wedding,  a baby’s first Christmas,   a graduation or a retirement.   The items we collect and keep and cherish may have no significance or value to anyone other than us,  but it’s our relationship to the items and the memories they symbolize that makes them valuable.

People who sell sublimation can often spend a lot of time debating what to make and how to sell what they make.   One of the things they can fail to take into account when figuring out what they’ll offer is what it is they’re actually selling.   Yes,  they’re selling cutting boards,  or water bottles or necklaces,  but they’re also selling memories  that can be touched and held forever.

Photos fade.  Paper degrades.  Letters and pictures and postcards eventually will become nothing but dust.  The mind forgets,  or gets filled with new memories.   You think you’ll never forget that adorable, perky, ears up alertness when your childhood dog wanted a treat,  or the beautiful sunrises at the cottage where your family summered when you were a kid,  but those memories will get less clear over time.    A sublimated keepsake freezes that memory, and gives it a physical form.  It’s something your customers can hold and hug and keep forever.

So when you’re selling sublimation,  remember that you’re selling more than a belt buckle,  or a puzzle or a keepsake box.   What you’re really selling is a aide-memoire,   a help in remembering a place or time or person that is special to the customer purchasing the item.   Memories can be fleeting or fade,  but a sublimated version of that memory will last forever.  And the best thing of all is that there are always new memories to be captured.