A Memory You Can Touch

A week or two back I participated in PromoChat, a great discussion from PromoKitchen that happens every Wednesday at 3 p.m. EST on Twitter.    One of the questions in that particular week’s chat was how you could sell your products as keepsakes that would stand the test of time and still keep your customers coming back again and again.    My answer to that question was as follows:

Focus on the fact that you’re creating a memory or preserving a special moment with something people can hold in their hands and cherish forever. There are always more special moments that deserve recording.

One of the things that people selling sublimation forget is that it’s not just a way to put a name on a mug or a picture on a mousepad.   It’s also a method by which memories can be captured and keepsakes created.    Yes,  some of these items might be one of a kind keepsakes,  only special to the particular person that commissions the work,  but one of a kind generally comes with a premium price.

Humans are,  I think,  in some respect hardwired to be collectors.   Maybe it’s shot glasses or spoons.    Could be dolls or dice.   People have collections of postcards,  playing cards and scorecards.   The one thing that holds a collection together is that the particular items are linked to a particular memory.   It could be a memory of place that was visited.   It could be a memory of a much loved person who is no longer around.  Often it’s a memory of a time,  a wedding,  a baby’s first Christmas,   a graduation or a retirement.   The items we collect and keep and cherish may have no significance or value to anyone other than us,  but it’s our relationship to the items and the memories they symbolize that makes them valuable.

People who sell sublimation can often spend a lot of time debating what to make and how to sell what they make.   One of the things they can fail to take into account when figuring out what they’ll offer is what it is they’re actually selling.   Yes,  they’re selling cutting boards,  or water bottles or necklaces,  but they’re also selling memories  that can be touched and held forever.

Photos fade.  Paper degrades.  Letters and pictures and postcards eventually will become nothing but dust.  The mind forgets,  or gets filled with new memories.   You think you’ll never forget that adorable, perky, ears up alertness when your childhood dog wanted a treat,  or the beautiful sunrises at the cottage where your family summered when you were a kid,  but those memories will get less clear over time.    A sublimated keepsake freezes that memory, and gives it a physical form.  It’s something your customers can hold and hug and keep forever.

So when you’re selling sublimation,  remember that you’re selling more than a belt buckle,  or a puzzle or a keepsake box.   What you’re really selling is a aide-memoire,   a help in remembering a place or time or person that is special to the customer purchasing the item.   Memories can be fleeting or fade,  but a sublimated version of that memory will last forever.  And the best thing of all is that there are always new memories to be captured.

 

How to Create a Sublimated Patch

Sublimated patches can be a great option for many decorators.   This type of patch is able to support full color designs,  even those with gradients and fades.   Sublimated patches are a perfect option when wishing to add a photo to an item.   Tiny details that may not be easily duplicated in other decoration disciplines will often easily be handled by a sublimated patch.   Sublimating a patch also ensures that the color will last as long as the patch does,  since sublimation ink actually dyes the fabric to which it is transferred.  Clearly,  there are a lot of advantages that a sublimated patch can offer,  and one big decision that needs to occur,  how will your sublimated patches be made.

There are two options for creating sublimated patches,  buy them already made from a supplier,  like EnMart,  or buy or make blank patches of your own and then sublimate those.  Both options have pluses and minuses.

Buying  Sublimated Patches

When you buy an already sublimated patch,  it comes to you completely done.   All you have to do is put it on whatever item has been chosen for decoration.   So there’s not a lot of time involved,  other than the time to create the art,  place the order and then add the patches to the item in question when they’re received.   Artwork,  at least when ordering sublimated patches from EnMart can be fairly simple too.  While we prefer and request vector artwork,  we can work with something as simple as a .jpg.   One potential drawback of ordering premade patches may be minimum requirements.   At EnMart the minimum is 25 pieces per design, size and color combination.    If you’re doing a small job,  that may be more than you need or want to order.   Price can also be an issue when purchasing sublimated patches.   If you have sublimation capabilities,  you may have to crunch the numbers to see if making your own patches is more cost effective than purchasing them already made and sublimated.

Making Your Own Patch

The other option for creating a sublimated patch is making your own,  and there are two ways of doing this.   One is to buy blank patches already made,  and add a sublimated design to them.    The other is to make your own patches from scratch either with a sublimated fabric or choosing to sublimate the patches after they’ve been constructed.   There are costs and benefits for both methods.

If you choose to buy a blank patch,  you will have less of a minimum than you would if you were purchasing a sublimated patch,  assuming you made your purchase from EnMart.   Our blank patch minimum is 10 pieces per size and color combination.  The time invested in production would also be shorter,  as you would only have to print your design and then press it on the patch.    One issue with this method is the fact that designs that go all the way to the edge of the patch would probably not work too well.   Another is the need to purchase extra patches in case you make a mistake.

On the other side of the coin is making your own sublimated patches from scratch.   Here you would need to cut the patch,  create some sort of border,  and also create the sublimated design and add it to the fabric.     This would most likely consume the most production time.  It is also a method that may result in something that looks the least like a professionally merrowed patch,  although that may not matter.    The plus side of this method is that you can make as few or as many patches as you need.

Keep in mind, for either of these options,  you would also need to have a sublimation printer and inks and paper in order to create a sublimation transfer.     That is a cost that needs to be included when calculating what method is the most fiscally sensible for your business.  Creating your own patches may seem to cost less,  but has hidden costs in supplies and labor.

Ultimately the best method for creating sublimated patches is the one that makes the most sense for you.    If you’re working with large volumes and often repeat designs,  than having someone else produce the patches may make the most sense.   If you’re working with short runs of a few pieces,  and only need sublimated patches on an irregular basis,  then making your own could be the best option.    Remember,  the best option is the one that makes the most sense for you and your business.

How to Choose a Sublimation Paper

Way back in 2010 we did a 2 part series detailing everything you needed to know about choosing a sublimation paper.   Eight years later (doesn’t time just fly) it seemed like a good idea to summarize some of what was in that series in an effort to help a new group of sublimation printers make their paper choices.   The original posts are still very relevant and worth reading in full, so if you’re inclined,  please take a moment to read Part 1 and Part 2.    If you’re short on time,  this summary will give you the basics.

To begin,  let’s talk about the three categories into which we at EnMart divide sublimation paper.  Our categories may be different than those other suppliers use,  but our experience has shown these category designations to be accurate, so they’re the ones we use.   In our experience, sublimation paper is either

  • High release
  • Low or Standard Release
  • Hybrid (combines properties of both)

High Release paper typically requires less time to press to release the majority of the ink onto the substrate.  This type of paper tends to work well for soft goods and may provide slightly superior color transfer.   One of the main issues with this paper may be smearing,  as high release paper tends not to dry quickly.   You may also experience “blow out” on hard goods like ceramic tiles of FRP key chains,  as the dye may be released so quickly that the harder materials can’t absorb it fast enough.    High release paper may also be more prone to curling, printer jams,  humidity and other environmental issues.

Low or standard release paper is pretty much the opposite of high release paper.   It dries quickly,  so smearing issues are minimal.   This type of paper works very well with hard goods and has little instance of “blow out”.   A potential drawback of low release paper is that it takes far more time in a press to draw the dye out.   Extensive time in a heat press can cause damage to or yellowing of coatings or fabrics,  but shortening the press time could result in colors that are less vibrant than desired.   On the positive side,  low release paper does tend to be resistant to jams and other environmental factors.

Hybrid paper,  as the name implies,  combines the qualities of both high and low release papers.   Some hybrid papers are more on the high release send of the spectrum while other are similar to low release paper.   The goal with this type of paper is to capitalize on the good points of both the other types of paper while minimizing the down side.   Based on our experience,  hybrid papers tend to be the best for all around use on all substrates.

If you’re wondering what type of paper Mpres Paper,  the sublimation paper that EnMart sells is,  it’s a hybrid paper.  The time required in a heat press is closer to the high release end of the spectrum,   but it mimics the low release papers in it’s capacity for quick drying to eliminate smearing, and the excellent release of color.   This is the paper that our parent company,  Ensign Emblem uses to create sublimated patches every day.     It’s been battle tested and proven worthy and we highly recommend it.

 

Think Ink

Cobra Ink.   No name ink from China.  Sawgrass Ink.   When it comes to sublimation,  it seems like there are a lot of choices for the ink that can be used,  but that’s a bit misleading.  Yes,  there are a number of inks that advertise themselves as sublimation ink,  but not all of them work the same way in your printer.   An ink that isn’t high quality can cause nozzles to clog,  print heads to break and designs to print with reds that aren’t red and blacks that look gray.   The quality of the ink you use matters,  for a couple of reasons.

The first is the fact that calling sublimation ink by the name ink is a bit of a misnomer.   Sublimation ink is made up of a carrier fluid that carries dye solids.     Because of this,  sublimation ink has a high viscosity and, at times,  more trouble going through standard inkjet print heads.   Keep in mind,  this is not in all cases.   We have countless examples of customers who have printed successfully for years with their Ricoh 3110 or 7700 printers.  Still,  sublimation ink does have an increased potential to cause problems when used in a standard inkjet printer.  One of the reasons that the Virtuoso Printers were created was so they could be designed specifically to meet the special needs of sublimation ink.

Another issue that can create problems for sublimation printers is refillable cartridges.   When it comes to printer systems,  there are generally two types,  a closed system and an open system.   A closed system is one in which the cartridges are prefilled and installed directly into the printer.   In this type of system,  there is no opportunity for dust or other contaminants to mix with the ink.    By contrast,  an open system,  one where ink from bottles or bags is poured into refillable cartridges offers the opportunity for air bubbles or contaminants to mix in with the ink.   The result can, at worst,  be damage to the print head.

Those of you reading this,  after even a cursory glance at the sublimation section of our website,   will probably notice that we carry Sublijet Ink and Virtuoso Printers and may,  as a result,  conclude everything we’ve said up to now is biased,  but you’d be wrong.    EnMart,  or EnMart’s parent company, Ensign Emblem,  has been working with inkjet sublimation practically since the process existed.    We were instrumental in bringing inkjet sublimation to the industrial laundry and rental uniform community.   After years,  even decades,  of sublimating emblems,  and occasionally making mugs and mousepads and shirts,  we understand how sublimation works,  and we know that the products we sell will provide the best finished goods,  because we use them too.

Sublimation Hints and Help

Like most decoration techniques,  sublimation does have a learning curve,  although it’s considerably less steep than some other decoration options.   Still,  if you’re just starting out,  or even if you’ve been creating sublimated goods for a while,  there are probably things you don’t know that could help you create sublimated items a little faster and a little better.   Every once in a while we like to do a sort of round-up post where we list some sublimation hints and tips,  in the hope of assisting our customers in their quest for the best possible sublimated product.

Cool, man! A basic step in the sublimation process is letting items cool.   Make sure the transfer paper is removed quickly when the item comes off the press,  and make sure items are laid out separately and not overlapped when cooling.   An item like a sublimated mug can be cooled in a room temperature bucket of water.   Make sure the water is not too cold,  as that could cause the mug to crack.

Humidity is the Enemy! Moisture can make a mess of your sublimated supplies,  so it’s always good to make sure humidity is kept to safe levels.   Protect your sublimation paper from humidity by keeping it in a plastic bag,  or a resealable bin.   If you’re worried the paper you’re using is too moist,  set it on your press for a few seconds.  The warmth will help remove excess moisture from the paper.   The pre-press technique can also work for garments.   Also,  using a cover that absorbs moisture,  like newsprint, in place of Teflon can help eliminate moisture problems.   Just make sure to change out the absorbent cover sheet after every press.

The Heat is On! One of the most common issues that cause sublimation failure is a heat press that isn’t heating up to the correct temperature.   Yes,  the gauge may show the proper reading,  but the actual temperature of the press can vary widely.   Make sure to test the temperature of your press frequently,  using either a heat gun or temperature test strips,  to make sure the press is actually heated up to the required temperature.

Stick to It! Heat tape is probably one of the most underrated items in your sublimation arsenal,  but it’s a must have for every shop.   Use it to keep your transfers securely positioned on your blanks.   Make sure not to tape across the image area,  instead securing the transfers on the sides.    Another useful item is a strong adhesive tape,  which can be used to secure sublimated images onto things like pendants or belt buckles.

Primary Colors! Anyone who prints on an inkjet printer knows about nozzle checks,  but they might not be as familiar with primary charts.   A good primary chart will show solid blocks of color without any lines or gaps.   Running a primary chart and a nozzle check is definitely a good idea if you haven’t used your printer for a while.   For details on how to run a primary chart from your Virtuoso printer,   visit this blog post from Sawgrass Ink.

 

Common Questions About Sublimation

Getting started with sublimation is really pretty simple,  but there are some common questions that people always seem to ask.   Since,  we know,  from talking to customers,  that people who are thinking of getting into sublimation do a lot of research online,  it seemed like a good idea to answer some of these common questions in a blog post.   So that’s what we’re going to do.

Common Question #1:  What does it cost?   First of all,  there are the costs of buying the equipment and the inks and the blanks and heat press and paper you’ll need to get started.    Often you might be able to find a package that will allow you to buy those items bundled together at a discount.     So that’s your initial cost to get set-up and ready to print.   What many people forget or calculate incorrectly,   are the costs that come along with setting up a business.  Overhead,  salary,  electricity,  heat,  all those things have to be considered when figuring out what having a sublimation business costs.   Sawgrass has done a terrific post on this subject for those who want more detail.

Common Question #2:  What should I charge?  A perennial problem for people who do creative work is figuring out what to charge.   Some use a formula,  their cost times a certain amount.   Others add up all their expenses and then figure out how much they need to make per hour to cover their overhead costs and salary.   One issue that can occur,  whatever formula used,  is that the business in question is charging less than the market will bear.   Leaving money on the table is never a good idea,  so make sure you know your market and what sort of prices your competitors are getting.   You can read more about how to set your prices in this post.

Common Question #3:  Is sublimation hard?  This is a question that can be answered in a couple of different ways.   One answer is this:  when compared to other decoration disciplines,  sublimation probably has the smallest learning curve and the shortest time from set-up to production.   Another answer is this:  Sublimation does require at least a basic knowledge of graphic software,  a comfort with working with a heat press and the ability to conceptualize designs.   For most people, sublimation should be pretty easy to learn and do.   The big trick is avoiding sublimation intimidation and getting yourself to take the first steps and try decorating some blanks.

Common Question #4:  How many items can I print per kit of ink/pack of paper?  Honestly,  if there’s a common question we dislike intensely,  it’s this one,  because of all the variables involved.   Things like your printer settings,  the size of the items being sublimated,   and other factors that will vary from shop to shop make it hard to give a precise estimate.   Generally,  we decline to speculate,  simply because it’s often assumed that what we’ve said is written in stone and not our best guess.

How to Cash In On The Holidays

T’was the night before Christmas,  and if you’re still printing sublimated items,  you’re way too late to capitalize on holiday gift giving.   While it’s tough to start thinking about Christmas when it’s not even December,   the time to secure those gift giving dollars is now,  not a week before Christmas.

One of the best ways to capture some of the spending that’s being done on gifts this holiday season is to offer some ideas for unique personalized gifts.  Pretty much everyone loves to get an item with their name or monogram on it,  but it’s even better when the item in question is something not everyone has or could buy.   Sublimation allows for the creation of personalized items that stand out,  either because the item being personalized is out of the ordinary,  or the design used to create the personalization is specific to the individual who is receiving the gift.

Another area of potential sales is home decor,  either decoration specifically related to the holidays,  or items that can be used to decorate a home all year.   When it comes to holiday decorating,   there are opportunities to sell things like ornaments,  or you could sublimate fabric to make table runners or a tree skirt.    If your plan is to make home decor items to be given as gifts,  it may be wise to pick a theme around which to center the items you offer.   A lot of people decorate their homes around a theme,  so you may sell more if you’re offering items for a outdoors theme or a country theme.   You could also have success offering to create items as needed,  working with the buyer to create items specific to their particular decorating scheme.

Don’t forget that businesses also need gifts for the holidays,  and many businesses are looking for unique and attractive things they can gift while also sneaking in a bit of advertising in the form of logos or slogans.   A business may also be looking for employee gifts like t-shirts or polos or mugs.    Don’t be shy about pitching gift sets to businesses,  something like a cutting board,  a serving tray and an oven mitt for instance.   Giving things that are useful and emblazoned with their logo is a win-win for a business.   The recipient of the gift gets something they can use,  and the business giving the gift gets multiple chances to make an impression,  since the user will see their logo or slogan every time they use the gift.

Selling Your Art with Sublimation

For most artists,  a major goal is to get the art out into the marketplace,  hopefully to be purchased,  which generates income,  which allows for more art to be made.  The problem for a lot of artists is that creating a unique artwork takes time,  and each piece can only be sold to one customer.  What is needed is the ability to reproduce a unique piece of art a number of times,  on a number of different substrates.   It would also be great if the reproductions could be created relatively easily and quickly,  at a low cost per print.   It would be even better if the method used to create the reproductions had, compared to other decoration options, a low cost of entry.

Sublimation is, as far as we’re concerned,  the perfect decoration method for artists who want to reproduce and sell their work.   For those who don’t know,  sublimation is a printing method which can be used on both soft and hard goods,  as long as the item is either made of polyester or has a poly coating.   Using ink and paper created for sublimation,  transfers are printed which are then set on the item being decorated using heat.   The ink bonds with the poly material or coating,  so the prints have no hand,  and are dishwasher safe.   The printer that’s used is a standard inkjet printer and the designs can be created with any graphics program.

There are several advantages to printing your saleable products using sublimation.   One is the cost of entry.   Compared to other decoration techniques,  like machine embroidery or direct to garment printing,  sublimation has a relatively low cost of entry.    An SG800,  which is the larger of the two desktop printers used for sublimation,  can be purchased in a package for under $2,000.    A heat press, which is also a necessary part of the process, can range from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand,  depending on the brand and model purchased.    Most blanks are also relatively inexpensive.   The cost for a cartridge of ink ranges from slightly above $60 to just over $100,  depending on the printer make and the size of the cartridge.

A second advantage is the fact that creating a sublimated design doesn’t require learning any new software.   Any graphics program,  Adobe,  CorelDraw,  whatever is currently being used can be used to create designs for sublimation.   If you don’t currently have a preferred graphics program,   Sawgrass’ Creative Studio comes with every purchase of a Virtuoso printer package.   This program is touted as being easy to use,  and contains a curated library of templates for the items that are most often offered by those who sell sublimated products.

One of the best things about sublimation,  especially for photographers,  is that the prints are photo realistic.   If you’re interested in selling your photography or your original art,  sublimation is the perfect decoration discipline for you.  Prints will reproduce exactly as they were created.   Photos will look like photos.   Hand drawn art will retain the qualities that make hand drawn art so unique and special.   The only difference is that sublimation allows the photo or drawing or design to be recreated over and over again on a variety of different substrates.

There are also advantages to owning your own system versus using a contract printer who will do the work for you.   Owning a sublimation system means you can print when you want and as many items as you need,  so you won’t be tied to minimum order requirements,  or have to carry an inventory of a design that didn’t sell.  You also have control over the quality of the finished product,  you create the prints and you can reject them based on your quality standards.   You also know all the costs involved in creating the product in advance.   There’s no last minute shipping or blank good upcharges and no potential delays in production due to weather or problems at the plant producing the goods.

All in all,  sublimation is a great option for a lot of artists.  While there will be a slight learning curve when starting with sublimation,  most people are up and running within hours.   Add to that the relatively low cost of entry,  and the fact that the entire process is controlled by the artist,  and the advantages, for an artist, of purchasing a sublimation system become quite clear.

3 Things That Make Products Suitable for Sublimation

A common question we’re often asked is what sorts of things can be sublimated.   The questions can range from “Can I use sublimation on a dark shirt?”  to “Are the mugs people use for sublimation special?” to “I found this piece of barn wood/antique tray/glass bowl,  can I sublimate it?”.  The common theme of all these questions is that people aren’t quite sure what products can be sublimated and which can’t or aren’t suitable,  and they’re looking for some guidance.    Basically,  when it comes to determining whether or not something can be sublimated,  it’s about three things:

Thing 1:  Color

As much as we’d all like it to exist,  there is no white ink option for sublimation.   This means there is no way to put a white underbase down.   A white underbase allows for printing of colors on dark shirts,  since the inks actually print on the underbase and not the shirt.    The lack of a white ink option to lay down as an underbase means that sublimation must be done on light colors.   Keep in mind that the ink dyes the fabric when set with heat,  so using any color shirt other than white will change the color of the ink to some degree.

While there is currently no option for direct sublimation, printing the transfer directly on the shirt,  when it comes to dark colors,   there are options for printing a sublimatable material and then transferring that to the shirt.    Our fabric sheets might work in some cases.   There are other thinner options for things like t-shirts that can also work.  There are also a few spray coating options out there  that claim to perform the function of a underbase. Do keep in mind,  however,  that these options are more in the nature of a transfer or a carrier and will have a hand and feel different that actual sublimation would.

Thing 2:  Coating

If you’re working with a 100% polyester light-colored t-shirt,  coating doesn’t matter and isn’t needed.  Where coating is vital is when you’re dealing with hard goods.   Any hard good, a mug, bag tag, key chain etc.  must be coated with a poly based coating that works with the sublimation ink.  Without this coating the ink will not transfer well and will certainly not be permanent.

There are two options for getting a coated hard good.   One option is to buy blank items that are already coated,  which means you can simply print your sublimation transfer and proceed to sublimate the item.   The other option is to purchase a sublimation coating spray or liquid and coat the item to be sublimated yourself.   While the do it yourself coatings expand the range of items which can be printed through sublimation,  getting the coating on evenly can be tricky.   If the DIY coating drips or is uneven,  then the finished print will have issues as well.

At EnMart,  we tend to recommend buying pre-coated items,  simply because we’ve seen how tricky it can be to get the sprays or liquids on evenly.    The advantage of a pre-coated item is that it was coated in a factory,  by specialized equipment designed for that job.   While it isn’t always the case,  pre-coated items are more likely to have an even coating and be free of issues that an uneven coating can cause.

Thing 3:  Heat and Pressure

An essential ingredient for sublimation is heat.  Without heat,  the ink won’t sublimate properly and the print won’t transfer.    Anything that is going to be sublimated must be able to stand up to the heat of a heat press or a convection oven,  most likely temperatures somewhere between 350 and 400 degrees.   Anything that would melt or warp at those temperatures is not suitable.   That’s why sublimation isn’t often done on plastic items,  they melt at the temperatures that are required.

Pressure is another essential ingredient in the sublimation process.   When an item,  like a mug,  is sublimated in a convection oven,  the transfer is held to the mug with a wrap.   The wrap is usually as silicone band which latches around the item and holds the sublimation transfer securely to it.   A heat press,  which works by latching closed around the item and providing heat also applies pressure to the substrate.  Anything that is thin or fragile will not stand up to the pressure involved and may shatter.

 

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What Sublimation Is (and Isn’t)

The calls are almost always the same.   At least a couple of times a week,  someone calls EnMart wanting to know about sublimation.   What it is,  how it works,  what can be made,  what it costs,  what kind of equipment is necessary,  the questions are all over the board.  Since the same sorts of questions come up relatively frequently,  it seemed like a good idea to do a post detailing what sublimation is,  and what it’s not.

What Sublimation Is:

First,  the technical stuff:  the official definition of sublimation is as follows:  “In chemistry, the direct conversion of a solid into a gas, without passage through a liquid stage. (See phases of matter.)”  Dye sublimation is the process by which heat is applied to inks turning them into a gas and bonding the ink with the polyester fibers of fabric or the poly coating on hard goods.  The result of the bond is a print that won’t wear out until the imprinted  item does.

Sublimation is a process that has less expensive start up costs than most other decoration options.   Those who wanted to go all out and get the biggest printer package and a top of the line heat press and a ton of blanks and the latest graphic design software could probably still set up their business for less than $7500.   Those with smaller budgets, or who may already have some of the components like design software or a heat press, could most likely get started for a few thousand or less.

Sublimation is a decoration technique that has a lower learning curve than some.   In order to create sublimated goods,  a person must know how to operate a heat press and an ink jet printer.  Some knowledge of graphic design and graphic design software is also helpful,  but not necessarily required.    There are programs,  like Creative Studio from Sawgrass  which can help with the design side of things.

What Sublimation Isn’t:

Sublimation isn’t suitable for dark colors.   The printing disciplines that work on dark colors are those that offer an option for white.   Anything printed on dark shirt is usually printed over a white underbase.   If your printing process does not offer that option,  then it is not suitable for use with dark colors.   Sublimation does not offer an option for white ink.

Sublimation isn’t suitable for fabrics other than polyester.   Poly blends may print well enough for some people,  but use of a poly blend garment will result in a more distressed look.   For best results,  print on 100% polyester garments or poly coated items.   It should be noted that there are coating sprays available which can be used to turn almost anything into an item suitable for sublimation,  but application of those sprays or coatings outside of a professional coating booth can be tricky.

Sublimation isn’t intimidating.   Some people are worried they’ll ruin a few blanks when they start out.   Don’t worry,  that will happen,  it happens to everyone and it’s part of the learning process.   If you can handle a printer and a heat press,  you can handle sublimation.   Fear of the unknown keeps a lot of potential decorators from trying something new and that’s a shame.  Sublimation does have a slight learning curve,  but it’s not that difficult to master.

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